WWI

Slaughter and Stalemate in 1917: British Offensives from Messines Ridge to Cambrai

Alan Warren. Slaughter and Stalemate in 1917: British Offensives from Messines Ridge to Cambrai. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2021. Hardcover. Illustrated. 253 pages. Review by Peter L. Belmonte Publisher’s summary: This book offers a fresh, critical history of the 1917 campaign in Flanders. Alan Warren traces the three major battles fought by the British …

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Review: Deserters of the First World War: The Home Front, Yorkshire, UK

Author: Andrea Hetherington Publisher: Pen & Sword Military, 2021 Review by Peter L. Belmonte Publisher’s summary: The story of First World War deserters who were shot at dawn, then pardoned nearly a century later has often been told, but these 306 soldiers represent a tiny proportion of deserters. More than 80,000 cases of desertion and …

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The Springfield model 1903 variants and the M1 Garand

Article by: Nick Jacobellis The bolt action Springfield Rifle Model 1903, the M1903 Modified, the M1903A3 and the M1903A4 were chambered in 30.06 caliber and first saw combat during the Punitive Expedition into Mexico, in World War 1, in the Banana Wars, as well as in World War II. The U.S. military service rifle that …

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Sidney Reilly, World War I Spy and Scoundrel

Author Ian Fleming, when asked about the escapades of his fictional spy James Bond, reportedly replied, “He’s no Sidney Reilly.” Who was Sidney Reilly and why did Fleming’s remark indicate that the smooth, suave licensed-to-kill ladykiller was inferior to him? Perhaps because what Agent 007 accomplished with the gadgets provided by the ingenuity of Q …

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Arthur Conan Doyle’s Military Innovations in World War I

The War’s Afoot: Arthur Conan Doyle’s Military Innovations in World War I

As Sherlock Holmes would have put it, when one has eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. Holmes used the aphorism to solve crimes, but for his creator Arthur Conan Doyle, the surly attitudes of Germans in attendance at the 1911 International Road Competition in 1911 convinced him that the automobile …

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