The Atlanta Campaign, 1864 Outskirts of Atlanta; The Atlanta Campaign, 1864 Fall of the City

Being there . . . . Civil War buffs, among those of us with tears in our eyes, to reread the oft-told
story of the ferocious assaults, extremely fierce fighting, and utter barbarous destruction of
proud Atlanta during the summer of 1864, one of final stages of America’s senseless War
Between the States, 1861-1865. More than 160 years have inched or roared their way past,
and, no matter who among the thousands of historians and general writers who tried to
describe the Atlanta Campaign, the result has always been the same: tragedy beyond
comprehension; longevities of crushing sorrow and grief; and, for casualties and survivors alike,
catastrophic lifelong loud cacophonies. Lincoln had pointed out as early as 1854 that the
feasible and moderate course amid growing tensions between the North and the South was not
to abolish slavery overnight, which may have been impossible, nor to leave it alone, which was
both impossible and foolish, but simply to put it in a position where its ultimate extinction
would be recognized by all as inevitable. Then, hopefully, everyone would sit down in leisure
and devise a solution, the best method of realizing the inevitable peace, painlessly,
constructively, WITHOUT THE LOSS OF ONE SINGLE AMERICAN MAN OR BOY. As we know,
friend-buffs, by 1860 Lincoln and a countless number of others found themselves helpless.
Ignorance and blindness in both the South and North won out and our sacred nation descended
unwillingly into the abyss of death and destruction.
GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT, SOON TO ACCEPT LEE’S SURRENDER, APPOINTED GENERAL
WILLIAM T. SHERMAN TO HANDLE THE CRITICAL, ALL-IMPORTANT, BATTLE OF ATLANTA, THE
ADVANCE UPON AND ITS ABSOLUTE DEMISE. 110,000 UNION SOLDIERS MARCHED OUT OF
SUBDUED RINGGOLD, GEORGIA, ON MAY 7, 1864, FOR THE 80-MILE JAUNT INTO THE POPULAR
“GATE CITY OF THE SOUTH”. CONFEDERATE ADVERSARY JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON, WITH ONLY 50%
OF SHERMAN’S MEN, HAD AN OTHER IDEA. FOUR MONTHS AND 50,000 DEAD AND WOUNDED
LATER, SHERMAN FINALLY SAW THE BRIGHT LIGHTS . . . CASEMATE PUBLISHERS’ EDITORS HAVE
DONE IT AGAIN: THE CREATION OF A NEW MILITARY SERIES, THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR. NOW,
TWO VOLUMES, ONE AFTER THE OTHER, PROVIDE US WITH ENTHRALLING, RIVETING, AND
SHOCKING ILLUSTRATED NARRATIVES OF THE HEARTBREAKING ATLANTA CAMPAIGN BY ONE
OF AMERICA’S YOUNG AND BRIGHTEREST HISTORIANS OF THAT BOLD AND SWEEPING FOUR-
YEAR FIGHT WERE HEROIC MEN AND BOYS ON BOTH SIDES ENGAGED IN DAILY HEROIC DEEDS
.
Both volumes reviewed and highly, highly recommended by Don DeNevi
“The Civil War, THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, 1864, Sherman’s Campaign to the Outskirts of
Atlanta”, by David A. Powell. CASEMATE PUBLISHERS, Military/Civil War: 2024, 128 pages, 6 ¾”
X 9 ½”, softcover, Casemate Illustrated, MEN, BATTLES, WEAPONS, $24.95. Visit,
www.casematepublishers.com. This fully illustrated narrative of the first part of the Atlanta
campaign examines the War of Maneuver that saw William T. Sherman’s Federal armies
attempting to outflank defensive positions held by the Confederate Army of Tennessee under
Joseph E. g Johnston, resulting in a number of sharp, bloody engagements.

“The Civil War, THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, 1864, Peach Tree Creek to the Fall of the City”, by
David A. Powell. CASEMATE PUBLISHERS, Military/Civil War: 2024, 128 pages, 6 ¾” x 9 ½”,
softcover, Casemate Illustrated, MEN, BATTLES, WEAPONS, $24.95. Visit,
www.casematepublishers.com. In short, David A. Powell, a graduate of the Virginia Military
Institute in 1983, is well known to Civil War “student-scholars” fascinated with the epic Battle
of Chickamauga. David’s reputation, as one of the three best ever on the subject, was sealed in
his room when he wrote his three -volume set on that bloody fighting. His most recent works
are “The Tullahoma Campaign” and “Grant at Chattanooga”. As for the two “Atlanta Campaign,
1864” titles, you can be certain they are as heart-wringing, highly informative, well narrated
with good maps and photographs, as are all his other Civil War articles and books.
Of course, to grasp and interpret their full design and meaning, “The Atlanta Campaign,
1864”, Volume One, must be read first. Since Casemate’s “page design” department deemed it
unnecessary to label somewhere on the covers, “Vol. 1”and “Vol.2”, the reader’s only hint of
which is which are the final four words of each volume’s subtitle, “. . . the Outskirts of Atlanta”,
the first half of the attack, and “. . . the Fall of the City”, portraying the final months of the
struggle for the metropolis. Chapter after chapter, from mid-July to September 1864, author
David Powell covers the battles after the occupation of Atlanta by Union troops around its
outskirts, Peach Tree Creek, Decatur, and Ezra Church, then operations east of Atlanta, Union
cavalry raids south and slightly beyond, and the fierce fighting for Jonesboro and its surrender.
The Civil War’s first historians and authors reaching back into the mid-1800s can only tremble
with envy how David arranged historic images, the camera young and undependable, to depict
his narratives, page by page, chapter by chapter for the real stuff: placing you in the sad pivotal
heart of it all.

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