The War of 1812; Russia’s Wars in Chechnya

Being there . . . in April, 1962, for the “The Score”, a Newsletter from Deuel Vocational
Institution in Tracy, California, in which John Rieman wrote in his column, The Library Corner,
reviews of “For Whom the Bell Tolls”, “The Caine Mutiny, “The Naked and the Dead”, and “The
Wooden Horse”. Although all opened with perfect lead-ins, the “truth” of one was questionable
– so much so that this reviewer refuses to acknowledge let alone accept it. John wrote, “There
has never been a period of more than fourteen years of peace throughout the earth before it
was interrupted by a war starting somewhere. And the wars since the beginning of the
twentieth century have killed more human beings than all the other wars in history combined.”
Can such a statement be accurate? Naturally a good number of novelists and writers of
nonfiction events have written more on these 1900 wars, especially those since 1939 with
peace intrinsically involved between the lines. If true, it seems to this reviewer that one of the
most significant efforts each one of us supporting readers of war history can offer is to
seriously, unequivocally, follow the writers to immerse ourselves in each of their unfolding
dramas, past, present, and on-going. What other options do we have? In developing their
writings about war, each author, whether focusing upon fiction or nonfiction, also intrinsically
prompts forward principles of democracy. Peace and democracy, but ever so insidiously or
quietly active. Read their concluding chapters. Remarkably drawn descriptions, by implication,
reveal the nature of the men and women who were and now are involved in civilian tragedies,
deaths, and destructions, but also peace, defense and loyalty of it, and the incalculable joys it
brings. Writers’ hopeful lineaments of peace’s growth are inspiring, permanent realizations in
words of their faith in them. Our awareness of war via their viable two seeds hardly hidden in
literature will forever remind us, lest we forget, the cruelties of unimaginable horrors which will
forever draw breath in our midst, in our lifetimes. But knowing that the truest of men and
women among us will always be near to reassure, defend, and fight to the bitter end, who we
must never lose, will speak out for peace and its democracies and the freedoms they bring,
until all wars are eradicated from this planet and the noun is extinguished and extinct.
UNAWARE, SERIOUS 20 th CENTURY MILITARY READERS ARE DISCOVERING AND RELISHING THE
NEW “ESSENTIAL HISTORIES” WAR SERIES PUBLISHED BY INCOMPARABLE, MATCHLESS OSPREY
PUBLISHING. SEEMINGLY, COUNTLESS TITLES AWAIT SELECTIONS BY HISTORICALLY MINDED
BATTLE ENTHUSISTS WHO, BECAUSE OF EACH BOOK’S INEXPENSIVENESS, CRAVE THEM ALL.
AGAIN, OSPREY LEADS THE PARADE OF WORLD MILITARY PUBLISHERS IN CREATING NEW
VENTURESOME AVENUES TO GET READERS IN THE RIGHT PLACE AND READY FOR WHAT
COMES. THE CURIOUS WILL ALWAYS BE THE HEART AND SOUL OF SUCH HARD DEVELOPED
SERIES PRESENTED. FOR CRYING OUTLOUD, BUFF, PULL UP WWW.OSPREYPUBLISHING.COM,
AND SEE FOR YOURSELF, THEN JOIN, FREE OF CHARGE, THE COMPANY’S NEWSLETTER,
WWW.OSPREYMAILING.COM.
Reviewed and Highly Recommended by Don DeNevi

“THE WAR OF 1812”, by Carl Benn. Osprey Publishing/Bloomsbury Publishing Plc: 2024, 144
pages, softcover, 6” x 8 ¼”, $29.
“RUSSIA’S WARS IN CHECHNYA 1994-2009”, by Mark Galeotti. Osprey Publishing/Bloomsbury
Publishing Plc: 2024, 144 pages, softcover, 6” x 8 ¼”, $20.
Okay, dedicated battle buff, and be honest about it, how much do you know of the War of
1812? Sure, you may know our boys were 50% of the combatants, but who were the others?
Italians? British? French? Puerto Ricans? Finnish? Etc. A dollar bill will be sent to you, if you get
it right. But you must stop reading my unimpassioned, unimaginative prose. So, here’s the
answer: the British and some Indigenous forces.
We know author Carl Benn from two of his excellent books, “Warriors: Native Memoirs from
the War of 1812”, John Hopkins UP, 2014, and “A Mohawk Memoir from the War of 1812: John
Norton – -Teyoninhokarawen”, U. of Toronto Press P., 2019. A reader couldn’t find a better
scholar to teach him the full story of the battles abbreviated. They raged across America’s
eastern frontier, Britain’s Canadian colonies, the Atlantic coast, the Gulf of Mexico, to say
nothing of the world’s oceans. Literally, the war shaped the future of North America as we
know her today. A beautiful little softcover you’ll want to add to that fledgling library of yours,
ready and clean for the day someone asks, “Do you know anything at all about ‘1812’?” New
scholarly research has uncovered much hitherto unknown, but, other than Osprey and a few
university presses, publishers feel there is no profit to be made tackling the subject.
Now that you are committed to ordering from Osprey or Amazon the “War of 1812”, what
do you know of Russia’s wars in Chechnya between 1994 and 2009? Like me, you know nothing,
nada, niente about them. The genius- editors of Osprey have complied another brilliant
abbreviation featuring, like “1812”, full-color maps and over 50 new images, especially since
they draw upon a wide range of sources to write succinct account on modern Russia explaining
the origins, history, and consequences of those battles. And, lucky us, no finer author than
prolific Mark Galeotti, a top scholar in Russian security affairs, and one of Osprey’s most respect
researchers, patiently tells it all in terms of easy-to-grasp narrative prose.
Then see if this reviewer isn’t right in demanding you check the other titles in Essential
Histories. Give up dinners for a week and you’ll save enough for five to seven titles for that
slowly expanding library of yours: E-mail: info@ospreypublishing.com, and/or
www.ospreypublishing.com.

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